Pathagoras Help System

Automatic Markup using Term Works!

Automatic Markup using Term Works!

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Automatic Markup using Term Works!

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   NOT RECOMMENDED FOR BEGINNERS. The Manual and Semi-Manual mark-up methods discussed in previous sections is the best way to build your first few Master Documents. Once you understand the 'end game', however, you might wish to consider using Term Works to perform the markups. It provides more automation, and therefore speed, but unless you fully understand what the process behind the process really is (and how simple it all really is) this kind of 'automation' will seem confusing, not helpful.

Markup using Term Works!
1.Step one is to pre-mark the clause breaks. Place a unique break-point character set at the beginning of each desired clause. We recommend the "(*)" character set, but you can use anything you wish.
2.Click the Pathagoras dropdown features menu. Click 'Authoring/Editing Tools' and then 'Clause Creation Tools'.
3.Click the Term Works!
4.The Term Works! screen will appear (Figure 1).

Click to enlarge.

Figure 1. The Term Works! Screen.

5.Click the <Bulk Add Prep> box at the lower left quadrant of the screen.

Click to enlarge.

Figure 2. The Term Works! Screen w/ Bulk Add feature selected.

6.In the upper right quadrant of the Term Works! screen, click the method by which Pathagoras will determine the first and subsequent portions of the document that you want to mark up. Here we are using the special character "(*)" so click "By Character."

Note the other choices: by 'Heading' and by 'Paragraph(s)'. These are viable options as well, but for this lesson, we are going to stick with special 'Character'.

 

Click to enlarge.

Figure 3. Name and Subject fields completed.

lightbulbsmallDigression: At this stage in the lesson, we are going to 'insist' that you use Pathagoras' Prefix/Suffix Naming Convention to name the clauses you wish to use for document assembly. Even if you don't fully understand it, you will thank us for this push.

   Using the prefix/suffix clause naming style will (1) enhance greatly your ability to recall your clauses from their ultimate storage location, (2) will allow you to keep the clauses properly sorted in their order of likely use and (3) will not diminish you ability to attach and display meaningful subjects to your clauses.

   (While we are being a bit 'bossy' here, rest assured that you will not be limited to naming your clauses in just this style. And when all is said and done here you can revert to 'regular' names if that is your final choice.)

6.Type the prefix you want to use in the Prefix box and the 'increment' (the amount of 'numerical space' between names) in the Increment box.
The prefix you choose should mnemonically hint at the subject of the book. It can be two, three or four characters in length. We are using 'wil' for 'Wills'. Maybe 'con' for 'contracts', 'pn' for 'promissory notes', 'bids' for 'bids'. Anything will works. And you can change your mind later on.
7.Type the starting name and number in the box labeled ‘1st Clause Name.’ Actually, Pathagoras will suggest the name for the first clause. You can change that. Indeed, if you expect that your disassembled document will contain more than 100 clauses, we recommend that the first clause be named xxx0100. That extra '0' after the prefix adds lots of growth space.
8.Type AUTO in the Subject box. This is what tells Pathagoras to 'automatically' mark up your document with the appropriate elements
9.When you are satisfied with the set parameters, click the <Mark> button. Pathagoras instantly surrounds the highlighted text with the designated 'begin' and 'end' markers. It then types in the clause name, incrementing it as it progresses down the page. The subject element, however, will not e 'completed' (because at this stage Pathagoras cannot know what words you want to provide. Rather, a holding space is provided for the clause's subject, with the words "Type Subject Here" inserted just to the right of the name.
10.Provide a subject for each clause. The 'Subject' can be anything (to 'make up for', as it were, the ‘naming’ rules).  The 'subject' should be relatively short (no more than 45 characters), but can, in fact, be of any length. As with all aspects of Pathagoras, don't spend too much time worrying about the subject. Changing it, if you find the need, is a very simple process.
11.Click the 'First' button in the BreakPoints section of the screen. The first section of text that meets the designated criteria will be highlighted.

informationThe first and last words of the highlighted section will be indicated in the upper left quadrant of the screen. If you need to adjust the range of the highlighted text, us the up and down arrow sets to do so. Note that the upper arrow set expands or contracts the selection from the top. the lower set expands or contracts the selection from the bottom. (It is a quite typical need to adjust the scope of the selection. Pathagoras' automatic highlighting of text may frequently not coincide with the range you want the clause to actually encompass.)

informationAnother 'tool' of interest in this section is the mini-scroll bar. Actually, it looks just like the arrow sets used to expand or contract the selection, only 'skinnier.' Use it to scroll the editing window when the top or bottom of the selection is not visible. (You can also exit the Term Works! screen to scroll the editing window, but you will probably find this technique a bit easier.)

 

  timeThe automatic markup tool does away with the necessity of manually placing the begin and end markers at the top and bottom of the clause being marked, and of having to be concerned with the proper pre-disassembly 'structure' of the clause. However, some users will find that once the first (or first several) clause(s) are marked, it is easier and perhaps faster to complete the remainder of the marking process manually. Remember that all Pathagoras functions are 'plain text' based.

  If you want to finish marking the document for disassembly by hand, consider this:

Highlight and copy the introductory section of a properly marked up clause.
Paste what you have copied at the beginning of each section of the document that you want to become a new clause.
Make appropriate modifications of the name and subject sections.
Copy the closing marker from a properly marked up clause and paste it at the end of each section of the document that you want to become a new clause.
Save the document. (Remember, we recommend including the word "Master" as part of the name.)
Run the Bulk Add routine against this marked up master. (To access Bulk Add, click the "Clause Creation Tools" in the Pathagoras dropdown features list and select the Bulk Add tab. Follow the instructions.)